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The pony express stations of Utah in historical perspective by Richard E. Fike

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Published by Bureau of Land Management, Utah, for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] in [Salt Lake City], [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Pony express,
  • Utah,
  • Historic buildings,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRichard E. Fike, John W. Headley
SeriesCultural resources series -- monograph 2, Cultural resource series (United States. Bureau of Land Management. Utah State Office) -- no. 2.
ContributionsHeadley, John W. joint author, United States. Bureau of Land Management. Utah State Office
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 113 p. :
Number of Pages113
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25398330M

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The pony express stations of Utah in historical perspective (Cultural resources series) [Fike, Richard E] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The pony express stations of Utah in historical perspective (Cultural resources series)5/5(2).   Eight and one-fourth miles from Dugout Station. The station was located within John Carson's Inn in Fairfield and saw use for both the Express and stage travel. The adobe building was built in It is still standing, has a wooden facade, and is open to the public as a Utah State Park (See Photo 17). It was operated by the family until The Pony Express Stations of Utah in Historical Perspective. THE STATIONS (continued) Wheaton Springs (Winston Springs) Utah No. 7 Contract Station. Location: NE1/4SW1/4 Sect Township 1 North, Range 2 East, Salt Lake Meridian. Salt Lake House (Courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society). 1. Gerald F. Harrington, Map of the Pony Express Trail (Oakland: Ca. — Photostatic copy on file BLM USO, Salt Lake City). 2. Kate B. Carter, Utah and the Pony Express, Centennial Edition (Salt Lake City: Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, ), p 3.

Pony Express Stations in Perspective. Overview. The demise of the Pony Express and the Overland Mail Service marked the end of an era in western history. The physical remains of both services are extant on public lands in western Utah and are being preserved, interpreted and continually studied. c.Z The Pony Express Stations of Utah In Historical Perspective is the second in Utah's series of cultural resource monographs. For the Bicentennial, the Bureau of Land Management studied the Pony Express route and provided public interpretation of the trail in western Utah. The Pony Express Trail National Backcountry Byway begins near Fairfield and ends at Ibapah, Utah. Along the route visitors can enjoy history and a variety of recreation. To begin tracing the hoofprints of the "Pony" visit the Camp Floyd / Stagecoach Inn State Park on state high 5 miles south of Cedar Fort. The Rigid Pony Express Schedule Required + Stations. Each station was located between 15 to 20 miles apart. The terrain determined the number and the distance between home stations and relay stations. Locations were governed by necessity, not convenience. At each relay station, riders would exchange their tired horse for a fresh one.

The Pony Express Stations of Utah in Historical Perspective; Cultural Resources Series Monograph No. 2 [Fike, Richard E.; Headley, John W.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The pony express stations of Utah in historical perspective by Richard E. Fike, , Bureau of Land Management, Utah, for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. The Pony Express route was nearly 2, miles (3, km) long overland, had about stations (mostly in Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada), and required about 10 days to rider generally rode 75 to miles ( to km) and changed horses every 10 to 15 miles (16 to 24 km). Utah played ‘a key role’ in Pony Express history, says ‘West Like Lightning’ author. SALT LAKE CITY — A prolific writer, Jim DeFelice has authored thrillers to nonfiction to co-authoring (with Chris Kyle and, Continue Reading.